Ultimate Guide to
Angler Information

Reel in Knowledge

The Ulster Angling Federation has many affiliate clubs all across Ulster. Click on a icon to see the clubs name.

Protect of River Corridors

Rivers and the corridors of land through which they flow are of major significance in our countryside. The extent of rivers has diminished little throughout the last few centuries, yet the aquatic life potential has been considerably modified and in a few cases destroyed. Rivers span the altitudinal and geological range and serve as corridors which link land habitats many of which have become isolated by intensification of land-use.

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Construction Works - Actions to Prevent Pollution

The Ulster Angling Federation is the representative body for game angling associations in Northern Ireland. We have a membership of some 60 associations with a total individual membership of some 7,000 anglers. The Federation represents anglers in discussions with Public Bodies, Government and other NGO’s and has been in existence since 1930. We are represented on a wide range of committees to ensure the concerns of anglers are heard.

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The Future of Angling A Paper from the Ulster Angling Federation

The Ulster Angling Federation is the representative body for game (trout and salmon) angling clubs in Northern Ireland. We have a membership of around 60 clubs with a total individual membership of some 8,000 anglers. The Federation represents anglers in discussions with Public Bodies, Government and other NGO’s and has been in existence since 1930. We are represented on a wide range of committees to ensure the concerns of anglers are heard.

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The Water Framework Directive Implementation in Northern Ireland.

In England and Wales the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has invested £110 million to improve rivers, streams and water bodies following Judicial Review by The Angling Trust. In Northern Ireland no such investment has been allocated to improve water quality of our inland waterways. This is despite the fact that in 2005 an assessment carried out by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) revealed that 90 percent of water bodies were “At risk” of not meeting European standards by 2015. Less than 30% of our freshwater bodies in Northern Ireland currently achieve ‘good quality status’ standard set by Europe under the Water framework Directive (WFD). NIEA plans to improve just 35 per cent over the next 3 years. However funding has not been secured due to the low priority placed on this Directive.

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External Papers

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